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Archives for : M. Night Shyamalan

Movie Review: “Glass” Might Not Have Been Worth the Wait

Before you read this review in disappointment, know that there are some moments of glimmer in Glass.

The end of Split (2016) left everyone in awe after realizing it was actually a long awaited sequel to M. Night Shyamalan’s Unbreakable (2000). This left us anxious to see the final chapter and how Kevin (James McAvoy), David (Bruce Willis), and Mr. Glass (Samuel L. Jackson) all tie together!

Glass takes place weeks after the events in Split. Kevin Crumb, a multiple-personality case nicknamed The Horde, remains on the loose with 20-something individuals living inside him. Among them: The Beast, a superhuman with an occasional taste for human flesh. He is continuing to kidnap teenage girls (this time cheerleaders), and introducing them to each persona before unleashing The Beast on them.

But he is now targeted by Unbreakable’s David Dunn. After being the sole survivor of a horrific train crash, David discovered he was indestructible and capable of absorbing memories of other people’s misdeeds at a touch. He’s a masked vigilante, who wears a hooded jacket and nicknamed The Overseer.

When David and Kevin come head to head, they are apprehended and sent to a mental hospital for the criminally insane. It’s there that we discover Elijah Price, aka Mr. Glass, is being held at there as well. All three have been brought here to be treated by Dr. Staple (Sarah Paulson), who wants to cure them of their delusions of having superpowers. Meanwhile David’s son Joseph (Spencer Treat Clark), Casey Cooke (Anya Talyor-Joy), the Horde captive who got away, and Elijah’s mother (Charlayne Woodard) are trying to help their respective others. They each try to vouch for their loved ones.

Keep in mind Glass is 2 hours and 9 minutes long. A lot of that time will feel very dragged and wasted.  Sadly, the major downfall here is the weak script. Hyping this film as a project in the making for 19 years comes with high hopes. Unfortunately, it seems evident that Shyamalan had great idea with an interesting beginning, but might have lost his way towards the end.

There are some silver-linings, like the fact that James McAvoy is just incredible with his ability to abruptly change personalities and deliver such a captivating performance. Of the few that were given, there is also a solid twist in the film (The other twists are a bit of head scratchers).

Glass is hardly a film to write home about, and I can’t say it’s worth paying full price for in a theater. However, it is worth watching, if nothing more than to see the conclusion of this “interesting” trilogy.

Rating: 2.5

Glass opens in theaters January 18.