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Archives for : The Avengers

Movie Review: “Spider-Man: Far from Home” Spins a Web of Fun

(l to r) Numan Acar, Tom Holland and Jacky Gyllenhaal in Columbia Pictures’ SPIDER-MAN: ™ FAR FROM HOME

We’re all still recovering from the events of “Avengers: Endgame”. There were traumatic losses, epic battles, and a perfect ending to that chapter of the Marvel Universe. Luckily, we’ve been treated to another “Spider-Man” sequel, giving us something to help heal those emotional wounds. Now if you haven’t seen “Endgame” yet, shame on you! Also, stop reading any further. (Spoiler Alert!!)

After the devastating loss of  Tony Stark (Robert Downy Jr.), the city questions who will be the new “Ironman”? As Peter Parker (Tom Holland) mourns the death of his mentor, the last thing he wants is to fill his shoes. No, instead he just wants to be a normal, love-struck teenager. That’s right,  the first hour of “Spider-Man: Far from Home” is basically a romantic comedy. And I’m fine with it.

Peter is getting ready for his science club’s Europe trip, on which he plans on telling MJ (Zendya) how he really feels for her. He’s tired of the superhero gig, and wants to be a 16 year-old kid for once. Thus we follow Peter on many failed attempts to sit, talk, or flirt with MJ as he, also, has some competition for her heart. And it only gets worse when Peter discovers Nick Fury (Samuel L. Jackson) and a “mysterious” new superhero, Quentin Beck (Jake Gyllenhaal) need his help to take down destructive mythological creatures. 

“Spider-Man: Far from Home” may not be as complex as the adventure we just closed on, but it’s just as fun. Coming off such a heavy film, it was nice to sit back and see these characters in a more comical setting. The movie still carries the essence of “Spider-Man: Homecoming”, but it’s much more lighthearted.

The visual effects are fine, and there are some thrilling action sequences. But as in all Marvel films, the characters are lovable. Tom Holland continues to charm every time he’s on screen. His classmates are the source of most of the laughs, and please give me more Happy (Jon Farvreau) and Aunt May (Marisa Tomei).

Though there are times “Spider-Man: Far from Home” gets a little messy and you might struggle to find out where it’s headed, it is still smart and does an excellent job of continuing Peter Parker’s story.

This is far from any other Marvel movie, and the filmmakers know that. Just go in with an open mind and trust that you’re in for a much needed, entertaining trip.

*Be sure to stay for the two end credit scenes.

Rating: 4/5

“Spider-Man: Far from Home” opens July 2.

Movie Review: “Ant Man and the Wasp” and “Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom”

This summer is a movie Marvel. Now, following the trauma of Avengers: Infinity War, the Marvel teams give us a much needed bit of comic relief with “Ant Man and the Wasp”. Here’s my ICTN review of the film and the latest installment in the Jurassic line, “Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom.”

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Movie Review: “Trust Me” Starts Strong but Ends in a Sloppy Mess

Clark Gregg swaps superheroes for child stars in his latest dark comedy, Trust Me, in which he wrote, directed, and stars.

What begins as a Hollywood version of Jerry McGuire becomes a depressing and grim look of how far the people involved in this business will go to get what they want.

We begin by seeing, once child star and now Hollywood agent, Howard (Gregg) getting fired by his only notable client for blowing a potentially huge deal.  Sometime during this botched negotiation, he luckily stumbles into Lydia’s (Saxon Sharbino) dramatic audition which turns out to be a positive for the young actress.  When she is offered the starring role for the next vampire teen trilogy, she immediately claims Howard as her agent. Lydia views Howard as the “nice” alternative to dirt bag agents who care only about money and could careless for the best interest of their clients.  Much like Howard’s nemesis, Aldo (Sam Rockwell), a skeezy, douche of an agent who has managed to steal many of Howard’s talents.

Lydia and Howard have a great father-daughter bond and work well together, their only problem is Ray (Paul Sparks), Lydia’s greedy, alcoholic father who tends to cause a scene everywhere he goes.  And just when things seem to looking up for Howard’s career and love life, he witnesses what he thinks might be a sexually abusive encounter between Ray and Lydia.  Now he must decide if wants to continue his path of success with his inevitable profiting starlet or let the “good guy” within him follow his conscience.

From the start you are hooked.  All the aspects of Howard’s life are thoroughly engaging.  He pines over his beautiful neighbor (Amanda Peet), and the two share a surprisingly charming relationship.  He also has great chemistry with Lydia that you feel could lead to a Tom Cruise and Cuba Gooding Jr. moment.  “Show me the MONEY!!!”

Needless to say Gregg gives a captivating performance along with his supporting cast.  Saxon Sharbino, who I had never heard of until this movie, shines as the tween actress who is so talented that it’s hard to tell if she’s being herself or playing a part.

In about the last 30 minutes of the film, everything starts to get muggy fast.  What seemed like powerful character development and a path of redemption quickly turns into an unsatisfying and truly unnecessary conclusion.
Trust Me has all the pieces for a fantastic, uplifting and/or solid flick; but maybe in an attempt to stay truly original, it past the mark a little too far.

Trust Me is in theaters June 6 and is  currently available OnDemand and iTunes.

Rating: 3/5

“Trust Me” Official Trailer HD

Originally posted on RedCarpetCrash.com